Nursery News

2017 Rock Garden Concert Series

As the kickoff to this year’s Rock Garden Concert Series at Fort Collins Nursery approaches, we’d like to share some of our favorite memories from past concerts and give you a taste of what’s to come.  Enjoy these photos and don’t forget to purchase tickets for all these upcoming shows!

 

 

  • Liz Barnez, June 15, (Benefit for Project Self-Sufficiency)
  • Patti Fiasco, June 29, (Benefit for Downtown Fort Collins Business Association)
  • The Holler!, August 17 (Benefit for The Matthews House)

 

Photo Gallery

Win prizes from Gus!

Meet Gus The Gnome

Gnomes have a reputation for hoarding gold and jewels. Lucky for us, Gus is a little more generous than your average garden variety gnome. From May 20, 2017 through August 18, 2017 he will be giving away Fort Collins Nursery gift cards and other great prizes to people who are intrepid enough to find him! 

Who is Gus?

Gus is the coveted prize for the highest bidder at the annual CNGA Colorado Nursery & Greenhouse Association(CNGA) Industry Celebration, a fund raiser for the Colorado Horticulture Research & Education Foundation (CHREF). Funds raised from this annual auction play a role in developing new leaders and applied science for the nursery and greenhouse industry. CHREF has contributed more than $217,500 to research and more than $230,400 to scholarships since the mid 80’s.

Gus is said to bring good luck to whichever bidder wins him each year, and we feel very fortunate to have him hiding out at our beautiful nursery this year!

Get Started

It’s easy to win. All you need is a camera, a Facebook or Instagram account, and a sense of adventure!

Here’s how to enter:

  1. Follow Fort Collins Nursery on Facebook or Instagram
  2. Visit Fort Collins Nursery and find Gus. He will be hanging out somewhere in our retail area. He will move around often, as gnomes are known to get curious and wander off. 
  3. Once you’ve located Gus, take a selfie with him.
  4. Share your selfie on Instagram with the hashtag #GusTheGnome or post them directly to our Facebook page.
  5. Win weekly prizes! 
  6. Enter again for more chances to win. Drawings will be held each Friday based on that week’s entries.

What you can win:

  • We have gift cards, concert tickets, and merchandise! Each Friday we will randomly select from the previous week’s entries, so visit often, find Gus, and increase your chances of winning. See Official Rules for details.

 

Reasons to Invest in Your Landscape

Find out how we can turn your home landscape into a beautiful investment!

First Crocus Contest

Get your crocus in focus and you could win Fort Collins Nursery gift cards!

It’s already February, which means crocus, those colorful little harbingers of spring will soon be peeking up through the frozen soil. We want to see the first crocus of 2017, so if your crocus is first, share your photo on social media and earn a chance to win!

Here’s how to enter

  • Your photo must show your crocus emerged from the soil and showing some color. The flower does not need to be open, but the bud must be developed enough that its color is apparent. 
  • You must include some sort of time stamp in the photo. Ideally, a copy of that day’s newspaper (just like in the movies!), but you can also use a partner’s phone in the photo showing a news article from that day. If all else fails, write the date on a piece of paper and include it in the photo.
  • You must share the photo on social media
    • On Facebook: Share a photo of your crocus to our Facebook page and tag it #crocusfocus2017. Be sure to make your share public so we can see it – if it’s not public, it can’t win.
    • On Instagram: Tag us (@fortcollinsnursery) and use the hashtag #crocusfocus2017
  • The very first picture shared that meets the requirements above will win a $100.00 gift card to Fort Collins Nursery. 
  • All other valid entries received from February 7, 2017, through February 28th, 2017, will be entered in a drawing for one of four $25.00 gift cards to Fort Collins Nursery. 

All entrants shall retain ownership rights for their submissions. Fort Collins Nursery reserves the right to use any works submitted for promotional or advertising purposes free of charge. Fort Collins Nursery may not sell or redistribute submitted works for any purpose other than the promotion or advertising of Fort Collins Nursery.

We’re hiring for spring!

If you love plants, enjoy helping people, and want to work on a team of friendly, fun, and motivated peers, Fort Collins Nursery has a great opportunity for you! We are a full service retail garden center. We pride ourselves in our energetic and helpful staff and provide paid training to ensure our employees can help customers succeed in all aspects of plant selection and care.  

We are now accepting applications for our 2017 season. We offer a wide array of seasonal employment opportunities, including:

  • Retail Sales
  • Cashier
  • Plant Production
  • Delivery and Planting Crew

For a listing of current job openings, click here

Beautiful Weekend for Orchids!

Orchid Obsession-2The 2016 Orchid Obsession event is now in the books.  Thanks to Hi-Country Orchid Club and Mark van der Woerd for organizing such an amazing event!  Local clubs, organizations and vendors wowed us with their beautiful displays and hundreds of orchid enthusiasts and curious onlookers strolled the greenhouse to take in the breathtaking sites and exotic fragrances.  We sincerely enjoyed hosting this event and getting to spend the weekend with the orchid clubs, American Orchid Society judges, presenters and guests!

 

Best of Show Awards:

Miltonia Sandy's Cove WoodlandsBest Oncidium Alliance

  • Miltonia Sandy’s Cove ‘Woodlands’ AM/AOS
  • Awarded to Sylvia Budak.

 

 

 

Bulbophyllum Elizabeth Ann BuckleberryBest Miscellaneous

  • Bulbophyllum Elizabeth Ann ‘Buckleberry’ FCC/AOS
  • Awarded to Corey Barnes

 

 

 

Unlabelled DendrobiumBest Dendrobium Alliance

  • Unlabelled Dendrobium
  • Awarded to Roger Stone

 

 

 

Blc Momilani RainbowBest Cattleya Alliance

  • Blc Momilani Rainbow
  • Awarded to Jane Arnold

 

 

 


Vanda Tubtim Velvet 'Perfection'Best Vanda Alliance

  • Vanda Tubtim Velvet ‘Perfection’
  • Awarded to Sherman Harrison

 

 

 

Photo Gallery

Big Time Fun at 2016 Giant Pumpkin Weigh-Off!

Joe with WinnerOur 8th Annual Giant Pumpkin Weigh-Off was a huge success thanks to many awesome contestants from all over the region.  They dedicated their time and energy all summer long to produce some eye-popping entries.  Overall, we received 12 entries in multiple categories including heaviest pumpkin, heaviest squash, prettiest pumpkin and longest long gourd.  The days top honors went to Joe Scherber from Wheat Ridge, CO.  Joe’s 2016 entry came in at a monster 1410 pounds, setting a new contest record for Fort Collins Nursery.  Here is a list of all of this year’s winners:

Heaviest Pumpkin

  • 1st Place- Joe Scherber (1410 lbs)
  • 2nd Place- Joe Notario (941 lbs)
  • 3rd Place- Bill Sahl (821 lbs)
  • 4th Place- Dustin Grubbs (717 lbs)
  • 5th Place- Bill Jr. & Melissa Sahl (514 lbs)

 Heavy Squash

  • 1st Place- Jim Grande (687 lbs)

 Howard Dill (Prettiest Pumpkin)

  • 1st Place- Joe Scherber

 Longest Long Gourd

  • 1st Place- Joe Scherber (107.25″)

 

Press

The Coloradoan

thedenverchannel.com

Tri 102.4

 

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Choose Celebration Plants for Special Events, People, Pets

By Deb Courtner

JapaneseMaple-Monrovia_NLSpecial occasions call for the creation of memories.  What better way to commemorate a graduation, wedding, birth, anniversary, housewarming, holiday or other significant event than by planting or donating a carefully selected plant to be enjoyed year after year?  Alternatively, plants are a deeply meaningful way to pay tribute to the life of a loved one or cherished pet who has passed on.

Flowering trees that convey caring include Autumn Brilliance serviceberry, with its fluffy white blooms, June berries and fabulous fall

color; the fruitless Spring Snow crabapple, with its fragrant white blossoms; Fringe Tree, with its distinctive, fragrant, hanging white flowers that look just like the tree’s name; Eastern Redbud, with its deep pink blossoms set against gray bark; or Hawthorn, with its spring/early summer flower clusters, dark red berries, and impressive autumn foliage.  If you like trees with colorful leaves all season long, consider a Japanese maple in well-protected locations, or Purple Smoke Tree.  If you prefer an evergreen, take a look at the dwarf Alberta spruce, with its compact, conical form, which will fit into almost any garden.

Carol Mackie Daphne-Monrovia_NLAs for shrubs, options include the semi-evergreen Carol Mackie Daphne, with its tiny, sweet-smelling pink blooms and variegated leaves; Tiger Eyes sumac, with its lacy chartreuse foliage, red stems and unparalleled fall color; butterfly bushes, with their heady scent and summer-long blooms; Hedge cotoneaster, with its shiny green leaves, black fruit and outstanding orange fall foliage; viburnums, with their full blossoms, ornamental fruit and pleasing autumn leaves; weigela, with their outrageously showy pink, purple or white flowers; and, of course, many varieties of roses.

Also, keep in mind that Fort Collins Nursery offers delivery and planting services for its trees and shrubs, and a one year satisfaction guarantee.

When selecting a plant for yourself or for a recipient, there are several factors to consider:

  • Where will the plant be installed?  If the plant is a shrub to memorialize a pet, for instance, you might consider planting it in your pet’s favorite resting place.
  • How much room is available for the plant as it matures?
  • What are the growing conditions (sun, soil type, water) in the garden where the plant will be installed?
  • If you’re looking for a flowering plant, do you want it to bloom at a particular time of year in honor of a special event?
  • What are favorite colors or fragrances of yours, the recipient or the memorialized individual?
  • Would you like a plant that symbolizes a particular virtue?  For example, red roses, hibiscus and wisteria symbolize love, whereas an oak tree represents strength and endurance.
  • Do you want a plant with a name similar to that of a recipient?  Examples include daphne, holly, and rose of Sharon with its feminine-named cultivars.  Or do you want a plant that has a name relating to the event, such as Peace rose or Livin’ Easy rose?

The staff at Fort Collins Nursery will be happy to help you choose a suitable plant for your special occasion.

Deb Courtner is a garden designer and writer who creates low-maintenance environments for busy homeowners.  She owns and operates Blossoms and Blueprints, LLC, a design and consulting firm in Fort Collins, Colorado. 

Low-growing Plants Keep Weeds From Gaining Ground

GroundCoverBlog-AngelaSedumBy Deb Courtner

Pity the poor groundcover; it gets no respect.  While trees, shrubs and taller perennials bedazzle gardeners, lowly groundcovers just quietly do their jobs–spreading steadily, preventing weeds, and providing a stage from which taller plants can emerge.

Groundcovers typically grow one foot high or less, although there are some taller ones, such as spreading roses.  These plucky plants add color and beauty to a garden, in addition to performing their regular jobs.

If you currently use wood or rock mulch around your plants, why not create a living mulch instead by planting attractive, low-maintenance groundcovers?

No matter what your lighting or moisture conditions, you can find a groundcover that will thrive in your garden.

If your garden is sunny and dry, for example, it’ll provide an ideal home for prairie winecups, with their lush, purplish goblet-shaped flowers and deep-cut, geranium-like leaves; orange carpet hummingbird, with its neon orange, tubular flowers that hummingbirds crave; Angela sedum, with its plump chartreuse spikes that turn orange-red for fall and winter; Pawnee Buttes sand cherry, with its white spring blossoms, outstanding red fall color, and black cherries that birds love; and soapwort, with its abundant pink or white blooms and evergreen leaves.  Incidentally, orange carpet hummingbird and soapwort are quite rabbit resistant.

Low growers that favor sunny, moister conditions are woolly speedwell, with its spring indigo flowers and evergreen foliage; cranesbill geraniums, especially the showy, long-blooming Rozanne, which can be drought-tolerant once established; and June-bearing strawberries, with their delicious fruit and bright green leaves;

Options for dry, shady gardens include pigsqueak, with its broad, cabbage-like leaves and upright pink blooms; some drought-tolerant varieties of heuchera, with its delightful foliage available in many colors; and dead nettle, which is anything but dead with its green or white/silvery variegated leaves and delicate pink or white blossoms.

GroundCoverBlog-PlumbagoShade lovers that perform well with average moisture include plumbago, with its startling blue flowers and copper seed heads set against dark green leaves; ajuga, with its beautifully variegated foliage and whorls of tiny flowers on spikes about four to six inches tall; sweet woodruff, with its delicate, scented white blossoms and small, umbrella-like leaves; and, of course, periwinkle, whose dark green leaves and purple blooms contrast nicely with those of sweet woodruff.

Once you familiarize yourself with groundcovers and their uses, you can create a more beautiful garden with fewer weeds and lower maintenance.  Then, perhaps, groundcovers will receive the respect they deserve.

 

 

How to Control Yellowjackets without Harming Bees!

European Paper Wasp_NLBy Daniel Laucher

Yellowjackets are a nuisance around the garden and home, and can be caught in a variety of traps using baits that bees and other wasps are not attracted to.  They are scavengers that seek out any food source, including your garbage and your pets’ food.  Yellowjackets are aggressive and will sting repeatedly if they or their nests are disturbed.

Yellowjackets nest in holes in the ground, unlike most other wasps, which build hanging nests made from chewed wood fibers.  These paper wasps, such as the bald-faced hornet and the European paper wasp, will defend their nests if threatened, but they are not otherwise aggressive.  You may find paper wasp nests hanging in trees or bushes, or in the rafters or on the sides of your home.  They should be left undisturbed, if possible, since paper wasps are pollinators and also prey on undesirable garden insects.

Honeybees and bumblebees feed on pollen and nectar, and will therefore avoid yellowjacket traps.  Many commercially available yellowjacket traps use heptyl butyrate as bait, which bees are not attracted to.   It is safe and effective to use such traps around your home and garden.

Homemade traps will also work to control yellowjackets.  To make one, mix some dish soap into a bowl of water and place the bowl in the problem area.  Tie a small piece of meat or fish to a short piece of string, then tie the string to a stick.  Place the stick in the ground by the bowl so that the meat hangs about half an inch above the water.  Yellowjackets fly very erratically; when they touch the soapy water, they will sink and drown.

Yellowjackets nest in the ground.  Locating and destroying nests will help keep their numbers down.  However, they will forage up to 1,000 feet from their nests, so the yellowjackets in your garden may have come from somewhere else entirely.

Prevention is important in controlling the yellowjacket population around your home.  As scavengers, they are attracted to garbage, standing water, and will even eat honey and larvae from beehives.  Make sure your trash cans are covered and tip out any standing water you find around your home or garden to limit their possible food sources.  Place traps around your patio, grill, mulch pile, hummingbird feeders and anywhere else you observe yellowjackets foraging for food.

Get rid of those pesky yellowjackets early with prevention and traps, and keep those honeybees humming.   Happy gardening!