Reid: From the Kitchen to the Garden

I learned the phrase from my mother: “Garbage is gold.” The garbage she refers to isn’t just any old thing that ends up in the trash can. Her stuff of gold is the scraps that accumulate in the kitchen from the not-so-perfect leaves of lettuce to the stringy orange carrot peels and the used coffee grounds.

Yes, my mother is a composter and has been since long before it became a fashionable thing to do, as it is today. As far back as I can remember, there was always some sort of receptacle under the kitchen sink filled with her soupy sour-smelling accumulation.

How often did she tell me over the years, “No, no. Not down the disposal. That garbage is gold!” For my mother is also a vegetable gardener, and she learned long ago the magical power of the rich black compost she created from things that so often end up down the disposal or in the trash can.

As I washed the dishes the other night in my own kitchen, I contemplated the half-gallon milk cartons that line the space along the back of the sink, stuffed with banana peels, potato skins, and apple cores. Nothing is wasted, for I, too, have learned the secret potential of what another might see as mere trash.

I don’t know where my mother learned the skill of turning kitchen refuse into a wonderful soil amendment, but I would guess it was from her own mother. The skill, no doubt, is as ancient as cultivation itself.

Whatever the source of the knowledge, I am happy to carry on the tradition.

My mother has taught me so many things, among them the lesson of the precious nature of garbage. I will think of her next spring as I marvel at the tender seedlings pushing up through the dark, rich soil of my garden. Thanks, Mom!

 

Kathy Reid, Account Manager

From the Archives Originally published in TreeTalk, Vol. 1 Issue 3, Fall 1993

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