Pinch of seed for pounds of produce

With Stay-At-Home orders currently in place, many of us are trying to limit our number of trips to the grocery stores, making it harder to keep fresh produce on our plates. Growing produce from seed is a great alternative and now is the perfect time to incorporate a minor lifestyle change that will yield major […]

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Give your lawn a breath of fresh air

As soon as the soils warms in Spring, it’s a good time to have your lawn aerated. Aeration, which is better for your lawn then thatch raking, will reduce soil compaction and to improve nutrient and moisture delivery. Lawns will also benefit from more oxygen to the grasses’ root system. If thatch in your lawn […]

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Cool season vegetable gardens

Late March is a great time to start planting cool season vegetables. Cool season crops prefer cool daytime temperatures of 60 to 80 degrees, and down to 40 degrees at night. Semi-Hardy vegetables such as beets, carrots, cauliflower, parsley, parsnips, potatoes and Swiss chard are less tolerant of a frost, and may need some additional protection. Using […]

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Test soil before amending

Test soil before amending

Soil tests are one of the most essential keys to a successful landscape. Many people add an all-in-one fertilizer every spring, thinking one application and forget about it. This can actually build up nutrients to levels that lead to plants’ decline. Besides basic at-home test kits available at the nursery, we have the added benefit […]

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Cut back ornamental grass

After ornamental grass has displayed great winter interest to the landscape, it is finally time to cut it back for new growth. Use sharp hedge shears for a clean cut about 4-6  inches from the soil level. Did your grass become overcrowded and lose some vigor? You can also divide grasses after trimming them back […]

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Harden off plants before transplant

Ever wonder why you’d need to harden off a vegetable starter plant? This term refers to the acclimation process of preparing a plant to move from warm indoor growing conditions to cooler outdoor conditions. About two weeks before planting, move plants outdoors to an area protected from blustery winds. Each day, gradually give them more […]

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Apply pre-emergent in early spring

Apply pre-emergent in early spring

Many of the best lawns are spoiled by a stubborn patch of crabgrass that sneaks back year after year. Crabgrass and annual weeds, including some broadleaf weeds, can be controlled with a pre-emergent herbicide. To be effective, pre-emergents need to be applied in early spring, before seeds germinate. Weeds seeds germinate when soil temperatures are […]

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Protect from frost, cold

Even the hardiest of vegetables and flowers need protection from frost and freezing temperatures. In Northern Colorado, the average last frost occurs in mid-May, and in Southern Wyoming it can be as late as the first or second week of June. In Autumn, the first average frost usually occurs within the first week of October […]

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Flowering trees welcome spring

Crabapple, redbud, pear, hawthorn and plum trees have a wonderful way of announcing, “Spring is here!” After a long, cold winter, these trees are some of the first to wake up and share their fragrant, vivid blossoms. Not only do many of these trees produce edible fruit, but also are well adapted to Front Range […]

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 Heat Stress

As the summer temperatures start to rise above 85 F., many of our plants will inevitably start to feel the adverse effects of heat stress.  Heat stress occurs when temperatures are hot enough for a sufficient period of time to cause irreversible damage to plant function or development.   Signs of heat stress include wilting, yellowing […]

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