Seasonal Product

Cucumbers

Cucumbers are fun vegetables to grow and are great for pickling, salads, or enjoyed right off the vine.  Cucumber plants like warm weather and need a lot of sunlight.  When planting cucumbers, choose a site that has adequate drainage and fertile soil with organic matter such as compost. Keep the soil evenly moist and avoid powdery mildew by watering in the mornings and watering at the soil level to avoid getting the leaves wet. Most cucumbers are vine crops and can take up a lot of space. Training cucumbers on a fence or trellis will reduce the amount of space needed and is a great method for keeping a tidier appearance in large gardens or for preserving space if container growing.  Also try a more compact or bush variety cucumber for container gardening.

Select started plants if you just need a few plants, or plant from seed for a larger harvest. Cucumbers germinate quickly in warm soil, and can be successfully grown from seed directly sown in the garden as late as mid-June.

We currently have a great selection of cucumbers in stock including the following varieties:

Marketmore Cucumber

  • Fruit size: 6-12 in.
  • Spacing: 15-18 in.
  • Matures: 68 days
  • Features: High yields of large, juicy cucumbers with excellent flavor. Resistant to most cucumber diseases. Great when eaten raw, in salads and pickled.
  • Water: Prefers moist, well-drained soil.
  • Sun: Plant in full sun.

 

Salt & Pepper Cucumber

  • Fruit size: 10-12 in.
  • Spacing: 18-24 in.
  • Matures: 49 days
  • Features: Small pickling cucumber with white skin and black spines. Great tasting cucumber that has a mild delicate flavor. Powdery mildew resistant.
  • Water: Prefers moist, well-drained soil.
  • Sun: Plant in full sun.

 

Lemon Cucumber

  • Fruit size: 4-6 in.
  • Spacing: 3-5 ft.
  • Features: Matures in 60 days. Sweet tasting with a fine crunchy texture. Color and size of a lemon. Good for pickling.
  • Water: Prefers moist, well-drained soil and heavy watering during fruiting.
  • Sun: Plant in full sun.

Drip irrigation makes summer watering a snap

By Jesse Eastman

Drip_Irrigation_NLYou may know the old saying, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” When it comes to gardening, preventing your plants from drying out is worth well more than a pound of veggies, flowers, and a beautiful landscape. Keeping plants watered throughout the summer can be expensive and challenging. Hand watering takes time and sprinklers can be wasteful. Drip irrigation is a great solution that delivers the right amount of water exactly where it needs to go. It can be run on a timer, allowing you to enjoy your summer without the stress of constantly worrying about your garden. Here’s a few tips to get you started:
• Know your plants
While some plants thrive in dry conditions, others can be quite thirsty. A drip system allows you to give each individual plant the right amount of water for its specific needs. If you’re unsure how much water your plants will need, ask your garden center professional for advice. Another important consideration is the soil. Sandy soil tends to drain water away more quickly than soil that is either heavy with clay or rich in organic material.
• Draw a plan
Sketch out each flower or garden bed, including the dimensions of the bed, how far it is from the nearest water source, and how many plants you need to water. This will allow you to purchase the correct supplies the first time. Rows of small plants, such as lettuce, radishes, and many annual flowers can be best served with soaker hose, while larger individual plants like tomatoes, squash, and many landscape perennials, shrubs, and trees are better served with individual emitters.
• Have a budget
Depending on the size of your garden and what you’re growing, you can spend as little as $20.00 on a 4’x8’ bed for something basic. Depending on how intricate you want your system to be, you can certainly spend more. Proper care and maintenance of your system, including winterizing it in the fall, can reduce upkeep costs in the long run. Whether you want to spend a lot or a little, the multitude of options available to use with drip irrigation makes it accessible for budgets of all sizes.

Throgmorton: Peonies

Originally posted on May 19, 2011

Herbaceous peonies that die to the ground every fall are one of the easiest, long lived perennials to grow. Peonies add texture and spring flowers to gardens from the plains to high country.

Peonies are grown from root divisions or tubers. Fall is the best time to divide the plants. Dig around the plant and down at least a foot. Lift the plant and wash the soil off the roots. Cut the root into sections with three or more eyes or growing points. Replant the root divisions so the eyes are an inch below the soil surface. Planting too deeply causes very small, weak flowers or no flowers at all.

Peonies prefer full sun to partial shade. They’ll grow in almost any soil. Because they are long lived, prepare the soil deeply with compost. Depending on variety, peonies grow from a foot to three feet tall and wide. Once established, peonies are cold and drought tolerant. They’ll do well at elevations above 8,500 feet. The higher the elevation the later peonies bloom.

As soon as peonies start to grow in the spring they need support. Horizontal wire cages that can move up as the plant grows are best. Support is especially important for double flowering varieties. The blooms are so heavy they fall to the ground without support. Some folks disbud peonies for larger, longer blooms. Flowers usually come out in threes. Removing the two side budsmakes the flowering period longer.

Peony flowers bloom in hues of white, pink, red and speckles of these colors. There is even a yellow flower variety. Some varieties to look for are Felix Crousse a rose red; Karl Rosenfield a double pink; or Bowl of Beauty a fragrant light pink. New hybrids are available every year. Use a peony with cut leaves to border a bed. Use larger varieties as accent or focal plants.

Japanese or anemone peonies have large, showy, single flowers. The Japanese types come in a spectrum of beautiful pastel colors.  They’re as hardy and durable as other herbaceous peonies. Fern-Leaf peonies add delicate texture to the cutting garden.

Peonies are fragrant. They’re a must in the cut flower garden. Peonies can be borders or accents throughout the garden. They’re easy to grow and pretty much care free.  Peonies have eye catching blooms in May and early June.

Tom Throgmorton, of Throgmorton Plant Management, can be heard on KRFC, 88.9 FM, every Saturday morning at 8:00 am.

Organic Veggie Starts

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The time to plant your warm season veggie starts is rapidly approaching and Fort Collins Nursery is your source for the best veggies and herbs! Come in soon to check out our Hardy Boy Organics tomatoes, tomatillos, peppers, artichokes, eggplant, cucumbers, squash, strawberries, watermelon pumpkins and more. Hardy Boy Organics are locally grown by Welby Gardens in Denver and are 100% USDA certified organic.  Keep in mind the average last frost date in Fort Collins is May 10-15.  Many vegetables will not tolerate frost or freezing temperatures.

Hanging Baskets

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Be sure to stop in and check out our beautiful selection of hanging annual baskets and patio pots. These colorful decorative pieces turn any patio into a relaxing oasis and help to utilize all available growing space. Hanging baskets come loaded with several varieties of annuals including hibiscus, mandevilla, lantana, verbena and geraniums. These make great Mother’s Day gifts, so stop in soon and pick one up for Mom!

Annuals

Annual flowers are loved by many gardeners because they are inexpensive, versatile and easy to care for.  Mixing annuals in your perennial beds is a great way to provide color in your garden all summer long.  While perennials typically flower for only a short part of the growing season, annuals try to make the most of their one and only year by flowering throughout the summer.  They also look great in perennial bed borders, patio pots and hanging baskets.  Our greenhouse has many of your favorite annual varieties in stock with more arriving throughout the summer. 

Varieties include:

  • Petunias
  • Calibrachoas
  • Pansies
  • Snapdragons
  • Salvias
  • Marigolds
  • Carnations
  • Geraniums
  • Zinnia
  • Lobelia
  • Moss Rose
  • and much more!

Pansies

Spring is here at last and pansies are back in our greenhouse in bunches! Their colorful, scrunchy little faces are smiling and longing for you to take them home with you.  Because they are hardy in cool weather, they are a great way to add color to your gardens and patio containers early in the spring season. Find our coupon in the April Valpak for a buy one get one free pack of pansies.

Columbines

The columbine flower is an iconic symbol of our Colorado landscape and one of the first and favorite perennial arrivals in gardens each spring.  They are easy to grow and will prolifically self-seed for continued growth in your garden.  We have dozens of varieties of columbines in many beautiful colors including the iconic Rocky Mountain Blue Columbine, the state flower of Colorado.

Pottery

Every great plant deserves a good place to rest its roots.  At Fort Collins Nursery you’ll find thousands of beautiful decorative pots and planters for all of your potting needs.  Our biggest shipment of the year was just recently checked in so you’ll find the largest and best selection of pots that we’ll have all year.

Veggie Starts

We have many veggie starts in stock and ready for your garden.  Now is a perfect time to plant your cold season crops like lettuce, cabbage, spinach, broccoli, chard and kale.  You will also find warm season starts like tomatoes, peppers and eggplant in our greenhouse.  Remember the average last frost date in Northern Colorado is May 15th and it can be much later in Southern Wyoming so keep your warm season veggies protected by keeping them indoors or using season extenders like Wall of Water.  Check back throughout the month of April for new veggie arrivals!