Seasonal Product

Pumpkins & Fall Décor

FallDecor_NLNext to changing leaves, perhaps no image symbolizes the coming of fall like the pumpkin. Once a staple of the annual fall harvest, pumpkins are used in a variety of delicious fall recipes such as pies, breads, cookies, and beer.  Their round shape and bright orange colors compliment the changing landscape and offer many unique decorating ideas for your home and garden décor.  Fort Collins Nursery has a wide variety of pumpkins, squash and gourds to suit your needs.  We have pretty pumpkins, fancy pumpkins, mini pumpkins and sugar pie pumpkins.  We have beautiful and tasty locally grown squash, warty squash and decorative gourds.  Straw bales and corn stalks are also available to give your fall display that extra kick.  While you’re here, browse this year’s great selection of new indoor fall décor.  We have a large variety of decorations and knick-knacks ranging from charming to downright spooky, perfect for this fun filled season!

Tree wrap & Rose Collars

TreeWrap_NL

Fall is here and it’s time to start thinking about protecting our trees and plants from the impending winter cold.  We carry a variety of products designed to keep your babies safe from the elements and keep them looking their best after the thaw.  Two products that we highly recommend are tree wrap and rose collars.

 

Tree Wrap

Sunscald can occur on the side of young deciduous tree trunks.  A typical Colorado winter day may be sunny and up to 60 degrees Fahrenheit, causing the living layer under the bark to come out of dormancy and become active.  If Temperatures drop below freezing it kills active cells and conductive tissue.  Young, thin-barked deciduous trees, such as honey locusts, fruit trees, ashes, oaks, maples, lindens and willows are at highest risk. Commercial tree wraps made of crepe paper insulate bark and are an effective way to prevent sunscald.  In late October or early November, wrap trunks upward from the base of the tree to a point just above the lowest branches.  Overlap about 33 percent with each turn.  Secure the wrap with tape, but be careful not to attach the tape to the tree bark.  Be sure to remove tree wrap and tape the following April to avoid girdling and possible insect damage.  Information courtesy of CSU Extension

Rose Collars

Rose collars help to protect the grafts on grafted roses (hybrid tea, floribunda, grandiflora, and many other specialty varieties) from freezing by placing the rose collar around the base of the rose plant and filling it with clean leaf debris, mulch, or compost.  Remove debris from the base of the roses, and use a rose collar to hold, compost, straw or bark over the rose crown.  We carry heavy duty plastic rose collars that can be reused year after year.

Houseplants

Fall is near and it’s time to restock our greenhouse with more beautiful plants. We’re expecting a large shipment of houseplants sometime between September 11-13* and we couldn’t be more excited about this order! You’ll find many of your favorites plus some new and unusual varieties we’ll be carrying for the very first time. Our shipments are subject to changes so at this point we won’t name any names… You’ll just have to call or stop in next week to see what’s in stock!

*Please note our houseplant truck from Florida has been delayed due to Hurricane Irma.  We hope to receive the truck later this week on September 14 or 15.  Please call for updated information.

Fall Pansies

Summer may be gone but that doesn’t mean you have to give up on having colorful flowers in your garden! Pansies are hardy in cool weather, and are a great way to add color to your garden beds and patio containers throughout the fall season. They grow best when night temperatures are below 65 F, which makes them ideal for this time of year. We’ll have a great selection of colorful pansies throughout the season for all your planting projects. Their scrunchy little faces are smiling and longing for you to take them home with you!

Fall Crop Seeds

As we reach the midpoint of summer, it is time to start planning ahead and planting seeds for fall vegetable crops like cauliflower, broccoli, lettuce, cabbage, kale, carrots and brussels sprouts.  With lower levels of light, more consistent moisture, and the occasional light frost, cool weather crops can excel during the waning days of fall.  With some careful planning, you can keep your garden productive well into fall and even winter.   At Fort Collins Nursery we have a number of great seed varieties from great companies like Botanical InterestsBaker Creek Heirloom Seed Co.Seed Savers Exchange and Territorial Seed Co.  Before you get started, it is important to know the following information:

Average First Frost

In Fort Collins, the average first frost date is October 2nd.  For those of you in other surrounding areas you can look up your average first frost date through the Old Farmer’s Almanac.

Days to Maturity

To find out the best dates to plant your seeds, you will need to calculate when to plant your vegetables so they’ll mature before being killed by frost and cold.  To find the optimal date, simply subtract the days to maturity from the average first frost date in your region.  For example, for a vegetable like beets that take 60 days to reach maturity, you would need to plant your seeds by August 3rd based on our October 2nd average first frost.  Most seed packs will list information on how many days until the crop reaches maturity.  A quick Google search will also yield several examples of vegetable planting guides like this one from CSU Extension. Worried you missed your chance to plant? You can easily extend the growing time by providing frost protection with frost cloths or cold frames.

Cold Hardiness

Certain varieties like broccoli, beans and winter squash are more susceptible to frost while kale and cabbage are more tolerant.   If you’re worried about losing your crops to premature frost, you may want to choose from the more cold tolerant crops.

Ornamental Grasses

Ornamental Grasses are beautiful plants that add texture, softness, color, movement and even rustling sound to any garden.  Grasses provide great accents and contrast to flowers and shrubs in the spring and summer months and also provide interest to the fall and winter landscape when other plants have lost their leaves.  Most grasses are sold as container-grown plants in #1 and #5 sizes and are easy to grow and maintain.  At Fort Collins Nursery we have dozens of wonderful varieties to choose from including the following:

 

ShenandoahSwitchGrass_NLShenandoah Switch Grass

Prized for its unmatched foliage color. Fast growing green leaves emerge with red tips in spring, darkening through summer, and turning burgundy in fall. Airy reddish-pink flowers in summer. Use for mass background plantings or in containers.
Light: Partial to full sun.
Water: Once established, needs only occasional watering.
Size: Fast growing 4 ft. tall in bloom, and 2 to 3 ft. wide.

Light: Partial to full sun.

Water: Once established, needs only occasional watering.

Size: Fast growing 4 ft. tall in bloom, and 2 to 3 ft. wide.

 

MorningLightMiscanthus_NLMorning Light Miscanthus

Description: Green blades have highlights of creamy-white margins and mid-veins creating a shimmering silvery appearance. Adds visual excitement wherever used. Accepts dry conditions.

Light: Partial to full sun.

Water: Best with regular watering – weekly or more often in extreme heat.

 

AvalancheFeatherReedGrass_NLAvalanche Feather Reed Grass

Description: Create stunning vertical effects with feathery stalks that emerge reddish-brown in spring, turn golden in fall. Stalks make attractive cut flowers. Foliage has white center and green margins. 

Light: Full sun.

Water: Water regularly- weekly, or more often in extreme heat.

Size: Fast growing, 3 to 4 ft. tall, 1 to 2 ft. wide; flower stalks to 6 ft.

Houseplants

Houseplants

As the calendar flips to July, veggies and annuals have all been planted and your garden and landscape are (hopefully) in tip-top form.  Now it’s time to put some attention back inside with houseplants!  Our biggest truck of the year has just arrived full of beautiful plants from Florida. The bountiful stock has once again filled our empty benches.  You’ll find an abundance of ferns, philodendrons, fiddle leaf figs, Chinese evergreen, dieffenbachia, schefflera and palms, just to name a few.  Don’t forget to check out our great pottery selection to give your new plant a fashionable and functional resting space.

Plants for Pollinators

Plants for Pollinators

Pollinators such as butterflies, hummingbirds and bees are necessary for the survival of most plant species.  By introducing plants to our gardens that attract these pollinators, we create a mutually beneficial relationship that provides them with a great food source while allowing the plants to reproduce.  Below is a list of several recommended plant varieties to attract some of your favorite pollinators and read this great article by Deb Courtner for additional information on the topic.

Butterflies

  • Milkweed
  • Butterfly Weed
  • Rabbitbrush
  • Chokecherry
  • Zinnia
  • Butterfly Bush
  • Serviceberry
  • Rose of Sharon
  • Lilac
  • Hollyhock
  • Hardy Hibiscus
  • Salvia
  • Aster
  • Coneflower
  • Daisy
  • Sunflower

Hummingbirds

  • Hyssop
  • Columbine
  • Penstemon
  • Snapdragon
  • Bee balm
  • Foxglove
  • Daylily
  • Lily
  • Delphinium
  • Petunia
  • Weigela
  • Butterfly Bush
  • Pincushion Flower
  • Verbena
  • Catmint
  • Garden Phlox 
  • Blanket Flower

Bees

  • Blue Mist Spirea
  • Zinnia
  • Cosmos
  • Daisy
  • Coneflower
  • Goldenrod
  • Apple (including crabapple)
  • Russian Sage
  • Bee Balm
  • Yarrow
  • Thyme
  • Veronica
  • Marigold
  • Honeysuckle (vine and bush)

Cucumbers

Cucumbers are fun vegetables to grow and are great for pickling, salads, or enjoyed right off the vine.  Cucumber plants like warm weather and need a lot of sunlight.  When planting cucumbers, choose a site that has adequate drainage and fertile soil with organic matter such as compost. Keep the soil evenly moist and avoid powdery mildew by watering in the mornings and watering at the soil level to avoid getting the leaves wet. Most cucumbers are vine crops and can take up a lot of space. Training cucumbers on a fence or trellis will reduce the amount of space needed and is a great method for keeping a tidier appearance in large gardens or for preserving space if container growing.  Also try a more compact or bush variety cucumber for container gardening.

Select started plants if you just need a few plants, or plant from seed for a larger harvest. Cucumbers germinate quickly in warm soil, and can be successfully grown from seed directly sown in the garden as late as mid-June.

We currently have a great selection of cucumbers in stock including the following varieties:

Marketmore Cucumber

  • Fruit size: 6-12 in.
  • Spacing: 15-18 in.
  • Matures: 68 days
  • Features: High yields of large, juicy cucumbers with excellent flavor. Resistant to most cucumber diseases. Great when eaten raw, in salads and pickled.
  • Water: Prefers moist, well-drained soil.
  • Sun: Plant in full sun.

 

Salt & Pepper Cucumber

  • Fruit size: 10-12 in.
  • Spacing: 18-24 in.
  • Matures: 49 days
  • Features: Small pickling cucumber with white skin and black spines. Great tasting cucumber that has a mild delicate flavor. Powdery mildew resistant.
  • Water: Prefers moist, well-drained soil.
  • Sun: Plant in full sun.

 

Lemon Cucumber

  • Fruit size: 4-6 in.
  • Spacing: 3-5 ft.
  • Features: Matures in 60 days. Sweet tasting with a fine crunchy texture. Color and size of a lemon. Good for pickling.
  • Water: Prefers moist, well-drained soil and heavy watering during fruiting.
  • Sun: Plant in full sun.

Drip irrigation makes summer watering a snap

By Jesse Eastman

Drip_Irrigation_NLYou may know the old saying, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” When it comes to gardening, preventing your plants from drying out is worth well more than a pound of veggies, flowers, and a beautiful landscape. Keeping plants watered throughout the summer can be expensive and challenging. Hand watering takes time and sprinklers can be wasteful. Drip irrigation is a great solution that delivers the right amount of water exactly where it needs to go. It can be run on a timer, allowing you to enjoy your summer without the stress of constantly worrying about your garden. Here’s a few tips to get you started:
• Know your plants
While some plants thrive in dry conditions, others can be quite thirsty. A drip system allows you to give each individual plant the right amount of water for its specific needs. If you’re unsure how much water your plants will need, ask your garden center professional for advice. Another important consideration is the soil. Sandy soil tends to drain water away more quickly than soil that is either heavy with clay or rich in organic material.
• Draw a plan
Sketch out each flower or garden bed, including the dimensions of the bed, how far it is from the nearest water source, and how many plants you need to water. This will allow you to purchase the correct supplies the first time. Rows of small plants, such as lettuce, radishes, and many annual flowers can be best served with soaker hose, while larger individual plants like tomatoes, squash, and many landscape perennials, shrubs, and trees are better served with individual emitters.
• Have a budget
Depending on the size of your garden and what you’re growing, you can spend as little as $20.00 on a 4’x8’ bed for something basic. Depending on how intricate you want your system to be, you can certainly spend more. Proper care and maintenance of your system, including winterizing it in the fall, can reduce upkeep costs in the long run. Whether you want to spend a lot or a little, the multitude of options available to use with drip irrigation makes it accessible for budgets of all sizes.